How much money does a saturation diver make?

Generally speaking, saturation divers can make up to $30,000 – $45,000 per month. Annually, this can add up to over $180,000. A unique salary addition for saturation divers is “depth pay,” which can pay out an additional $1- $4 per foot.

How much do saturation diver earn?

$80,000 PA

Typically the base pay can range within $50-60k a year and then is supplemented by per dive completed plus over time. It is expected that most first year divers, should make about $80,000 a year working at either Tassal or Petuna, depending on the amount of diving and overtime worked.

How much does a saturation diver earn in the North Sea?

However divers working regularly on offshore wind projects can earn up to £100,000 a year. Offshore divers in Scotland can earn around £600 a day. On average, they work around 120-150 days a year. Experienced saturation divers working offshore can earn £1,500 a day or more.

What is the highest paying diving job?

Highest Paying Commercial Diving Jobs & Careers

  • HAZMAT Diving: Considered one of the dirtiest jobs in commercial diving, HAZMAT commercial diving offers great compensation including benefits an average salary of over $58,000. …
  • Saturation Diving: …
  • Nuclear Diving: …
  • Off-Shore Commercial Diving:
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How much do saturation divers work?

Depth of Work: How Much Money Does a Saturation Diver Make? Saturation divers make up to $45,000 – $90,000 per month and over $500,000 annually. They receive “depth pay” which typically pays out an additional $1 – $4 per foot. Usually, it’s $1 per foot up to 100 feet, then it raises up to $2 per foot after that.

Do commercial divers make good money?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, commercial divers and underwater welders have a mean (average) hourly wage of $26.32, while the mean annual wage is approximately $54,750. Additionally, the top percentile (90%) can make approximately $93,910 or more.

Does underwater welding shorten your life?

If we look at these numbers at face value, it paints a disturbing picture: An underwater welder life expectancy is about 5 – 10 times lower than laborers working in construction or manufacturing.

How deep do saturation divers go?

Saturation Operations

Today, most sat diving is conducted between 65 feet and 1,000 feet. Decompression from these depths takes approximately one day per 100 feet of seawater plus a day. A dive to 650 feet would take approximately eight days of decompression.

How much do oil rig divers earn?

In a perfect year an offshore diver might work for six months and earn more than £200,000 ($260,000).

How much do divers on oil rigs make?

Some who work on offshore oil rigs can make over $100,000 annually, according to “Dangerous Jobs Guide.” But the average annual salary for deep sea divers was $54,750 as of May 2012, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which categorizes these divers as commercial divers.

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Can you make a career out of scuba diving?

While it is possible to have a career in diving with only an open water certification, often times it takes more training to achieve professional status. Below, we describe a few careers in which you can dive for a living!

How much do golf ball divers make?

Typically, golf ball divers earn money for each ball they recover. Buyers include the golf course, retailers, and golf ball companies. Anecdotal information suggests that divers earn about $200 a day.

Do saturation divers live underwater?

During saturation diving, the divers live in a pressurized environment, which can be a saturation system on the surface, or an ambient pressure underwater habitat, when not in the water.

Does diving shorten life?

A healthy diver who is relatively active, doesn’t smoke and follows a balanced diet, however, will have lower risks for certain diseases and injuries that could decrease quality of life or overall lifespan for others.

Is Chris Lemons still diving?

Chris has been a commercial diver for over 14 years, and currently specialises in deep sea Saturation diving, operating almost exclusively in the Oil and Gas Industry.